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Ph.D de

Ph.D
Group :

Physical and Tangible Information Visualization

Starts on 01/12/2010
Advisor : FEKETE, Jean-Daniel

Funding :
Affiliation : Université Paris-Sud
Laboratory : LRI INRIA Saclay

Defended on 10/03/2014, committee :
Encadrants :

Jean-Daniel Fekete, Inria

Pierre Dragicevic, Inria


Rapporteurs :

Jason Dykes, City University London

Kasper Hornbæk, University of Copenhagen


Examinateurs :

Michel Beaudouin-Lafon, Université Paris-Sud

Sheelagh Carpendale, University of Calgary

Research activities :

Abstract :
Computers immensely increased the amount of data we can collect and process as well as diversified the ways we can represent it visually. Computer-supported visualization systems, studied in the field of information visualization (infovis), have become powerful and complex, and sophisticated interaction techniques are now necessary to control them. With the widening of technological possibilities beyond classic desktop settings, new opportunities have emerged. Not only display surfaces of arbitrary shapes and sizes can be used to show richer visualizations, but also new input technologies can be used to manipulate them. For example, tangible user interfaces are an emerging input technology that capitalizes on humans' abilities to manipulate physical objects. However, these technologies have been barely studied in the field of information visualization.

In this thesis, I establish embodiment as a design principle for infovis purposes, I demonstrate and validate the efficiency and usability of both embodied visualization controls and embodied visualization displays through three controlled user experiments. I then present a conceptual interaction model and visual notation system that facilitates the description, comparison and criticism of various types of visualization systems and illustrate it through case studies of currently existing point solutions. Finally, to aid the creation of physical visualizations, I present a software tool that supports users in building their own visualizations. The tool is suitable for users new to both visualization and digital fabrication, and can help to increase users' awareness of and interest in data in their everyday live. In summary, this thesis contributes to the understanding of the value of emerging physical representations for information visualization.

Ph.D. dissertations & Faculty habilitations
APPRENTISSAGE ET OPTIMISATION SUR LES GRAPHES


ANALYSE DE DONNéES MULTI-MODALES POUR LES PATHOLOGIES COMPLEXES PAR LA CONCEPTION ET L’IMPLéMENTATION DE PROTOCOLES REPRODUCTIBLES ET RéUTILISABLES


DESIGNING INTERACTIVE TOOLS FOR CREATORS AND CREATIVE WORK
Creative work has been at the core of research in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). I describe the results of a series of studies that look at how creators work, where creators include artists with years of professional practice, as well as learners, or novices and casual makers. My research focuses on three creation activities: drawing, physical modeling, and music composition. For these activities, I examine how artists switch between representations and how these representations evolve throughout their creative process, from early sketches to fine-grained forms or structured vocabularies. I present interactive systems that enrich their workflow (i) by extending their computer tools with physical user interfaces, or (ii) by making physical materials interactive. I also argue that sketch-based representations can allow for user interfaces that are more personal and less rigid. My presentation will reflect on lessons and limitations of this work and discuss challenges for future design-support tools.