Français Anglais
Accueil Annuaire Plan du site
Home > Research results > Dissertations & habilitations
Research results
Ph.D de

Ph.D
Group : Parallel Architecture

Decoupled approaches to Register and Software-controlled memory allocations

Starts on 01/10/2007
Advisor : COHEN, Albert

Funding : AM
Affiliation : Université Paris-Sud
Laboratory : INRIA Saclay

Defended on 15/12/2011, committee :
Directeur de thèse:
Albert Cohen, Directeur de recherche, INRIA

Président :
Yannis MANOUSSAKIS, Professeur, Université Paris-Sud 11

Rapporteurs :
Pierre BOULET, Professeur, LIFL de Lille
Jingling XUE, Professeur, University New South Wales

Examinateurs :
Fabrice RASTELLO, Docteur, ENS de Lyon
Sebastian HACK, Professeur, Saarland University
Florent BOUCHEZ, Docteur, Kalray

Research activities :

Abstract :
Register and local memory allocation are two important optimizations performed during compilation. The former optimization maps the variables of a program to either machine registers or main memory locations. The
latter one maps arrays to either local memory or main memory locations. Recent work in register allocation leverages the complexity and performance benefits of decoupling its allocation and assignment phases.

In this thesis, we exploit the decoupled approach to propose a split register allocator,showing that linear complexity does not imply reduced code quality in just-in-time compilation, and to address the spill minimization problem. Considering the similarities between the register and local memory allocation problems, we study how a decoupled approach could be applied to the local memory allocation problem. We propose
theoretical basis of such an approach, validate it experimentally and reset a bridge between the register and local memory allocation problems.

Ph.D. dissertations & Faculty habilitations
DECODING THE PLATFORM SOCIETY: ORGANIZATIONS, MARKETS AND NETWORKS IN THE DIGITAL ECONOMY
The original manuscript conceptualizes the recent rise of digital platforms along three main dimensions: their nature of coordination devices fueled by data, the ensuing transformations of labor, and the accompanying promises of societal innovation. The overall ambition is to unpack the coordination role of the platform and where it stands in the horizon of the classical firm – market duality. It is also to precisely understand how it uses data to do so, where it drives labor, and how it accommodates socially innovative projects. I extend this analysis to show continuity between today’s society dominated by platforms and the “organizational society”, claiming that platforms are organized structures that distribute resources, produce asymmetries of wealth and power, and push social innovation to the periphery of the system. I discuss the policy implications of these tendencies and propose avenues for follow-up research.

DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING WITH LIMITED RESOURCES


VALORISATION DES DONNéES POUR LA RECHERCHE D'EMPLO