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Ph.D de

Ph.D
Group : Parallel Architecture

Erbium: Reconciling languages, runtimes, compilation and optimizations for streaming applications

Starts on 01/10/1997
Advisor : COHEN, Albert

Funding : Bourse pour étudiant étranger
Affiliation : Université Paris-Sud
Laboratory : INRIA alchemy

Defended on 11/02/2013, committee :
Albert Cohen, Directeur de recherche, École Normale Supérieure,
Directeur de Thèse
Alain Darte, Directeur de recherche, CNRS, Rapporteur
Marc Duranton, Directeur de recherche, CEA, Examinateur
Daniel Etiemble, Professeur, Univ. Paris Sud, Examinateur
Luciano Lavagno, Professeur, Politecnico du Torino, Rapporteur

Research activities :

Abstract :
As diminishing returns in single-thread performance and power
limitations hit the microprocessor industry, chip-multiprocessors became
ubiquitous. It brought old, difficult problems back into the software
equation. Compilers regain attention by being one of the critical
"puzzle pieces" in the quest for translating Moore's law into the
expected performance improvements, which cannot be achieved without
thread-level parallelism. Nevertheless, parallel systems research has
mainly focused on the language and architectural aspects, and much
potential remains to be explored to compile parallel programs, to
optimize them and to adapt them for the efficient exploitation of
parallel hardware.
This thesis addresses these problems by presenting Erbium, a low level
streaming data-flow language, supporting multiple producer and consumer
task communication; a very efficient runtime implementation for x86
architectures and variants to address other types of architectures; a
compiler integration of the language as an intermediate representation
in GCC; a study of the language primitives dependences, allowing
compilers to further optimise the Erbium code through specific parallel
optimisations as well as through generalized forms of classical compiler
optimisations, such as partial redundancy elimination and dead code
elimination.

Ph.D. dissertations & Faculty habilitations
DECODING THE PLATFORM SOCIETY: ORGANIZATIONS, MARKETS AND NETWORKS IN THE DIGITAL ECONOMY
The original manuscript conceptualizes the recent rise of digital platforms along three main dimensions: their nature of coordination devices fueled by data, the ensuing transformations of labor, and the accompanying promises of societal innovation. The overall ambition is to unpack the coordination role of the platform and where it stands in the horizon of the classical firm – market duality. It is also to precisely understand how it uses data to do so, where it drives labor, and how it accommodates socially innovative projects. I extend this analysis to show continuity between today’s society dominated by platforms and the “organizational society”, claiming that platforms are organized structures that distribute resources, produce asymmetries of wealth and power, and push social innovation to the periphery of the system. I discuss the policy implications of these tendencies and propose avenues for follow-up research.

DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING WITH LIMITED RESOURCES


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