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Ph.D de

Ph.D
Group : Graphs, ALgorithms and Combinatorics

Tag Counting and Monitoring in Large-scale RFID Systems:Theoretical Foundation and Algorithm Design

Starts on 01/10/2013
Advisor : CHEN, Lin

Funding :
Affiliation : Université Paris-Sud
Laboratory : LRI -GALaC

Defended on 06/12/2016, committee :

Research activities :

Abstract :
Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology has been experiencing ever-increasing deployment in a wide-range of various applications, such as inventory control and supply chain management. In this talk, we present a systematic research on a number of research problems related to tag counting and monitoring, one of the most fundamental component in RFID systems, particularly when the system scales. These problems are simple to state and intuitively understandable, while of both fundamental and practical importance, and require non-trivial efforts to solve. Specifically, we address the following problems ranging from theoretical modeling and analysis, to practical algorithm design and optimisation.
• Stability analysis of the frame slotted Aloha (FSA) protocol, the de facto standard in RFID tag counting and identification,
• Tag population estimation in dynamic RFID systems,
• Missing tag event detection in the presence of unexpected tags,
• Missing tag event detection in multiple-group multiple-region RFID systems.

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