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Research results
Ph.D de

Ph.D
Group : Parallel Systems

Méthodes de génération automatique de code appliquées à l’algèbre linéaire numérique dans le calcul haute performance

Starts on 01/10/2013
Advisor : BABOULIN, Marc

Funding : Contrat doctoral uniquement recherche
Affiliation : Université Paris-Sud
Laboratory : LRI PARSYS

Defended on 26/09/2016, committee :
Directeur de thèse
Marc Baboulin, Professeur, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay

Co-encadrant de thèse
Joël Falcou, Maître de Conférences, Univ. Paris-Sud,

Rapporteurs
-Paolo Bientinesi, Professeur, Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
-David Hill, Professeur, Univ. Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand

Examinateurs
-Frédéric Magoulès, Professeur, Ecole Centrale Paris
-Emmanuel Chailloux, Professeur, Université Pierre et Marie Curie

Research activities :

Abstract :
Parallelism in today’s computer architectures is ubiquitous whether it be in supercomputers, workstations or on portable devices such as smartphones. Exploiting efficiently these systems for a specific application requires a multidisciplinary effort that concerns Domain Specific Languages (DSL), code generation and optimization techniques as well as application-specific numerical algorithms.
In this PhD thesis, we present a method of high level programming that takes into account the features of heterogeneous architectures and the properties of matrices to build a generic dense linear algebra solver. As GPUs have become an asset in high performance computing, incorporating their use in general solvers is an important issue.
We extend our approach to a new multistage programming model that alleviates the interoperability problems between the CPU and GPU programming models.
Our multistage approach is used to automatically generate GPU code for CPU-based
element-wise expressions and parallel skeletons while allowing for type-safe program generation.
Finally, we investigate how to apply high level programming techniques to batched
computations and tensor contractions. We first explain how to design a simple data container
using modern C++-14 programming techniques. Then, we study the issues around batched
computations, memory locality and code vectorization to implement a highly optimized
matrix-matrix product for small sizes using SIMD instructions.

Ph.D. dissertations & Faculty habilitations
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Creative work has been at the core of research in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). I describe the results of a series of studies that look at how creators work, where creators include artists with years of professional practice, as well as learners, or novices and casual makers. My research focuses on three creation activities: drawing, physical modeling, and music composition. For these activities, I examine how artists switch between representations and how these representations evolve throughout their creative process, from early sketches to fine-grained forms or structured vocabularies. I present interactive systems that enrich their workflow (i) by extending their computer tools with physical user interfaces, or (ii) by making physical materials interactive. I also argue that sketch-based representations can allow for user interfaces that are more personal and less rigid. My presentation will reflect on lessons and limitations of this work and discuss challenges for future design-support tools.