Français Anglais
Accueil Annuaire Plan du site
Home > Research results > Dissertations & habilitations
Research results
Ph.D de

Ph.D
Group : Verification of Algorithms, Languages and Systems

Extensions of the backward reachability algorithm in the context of model checking modulo theories

Starts on 01/10/2015
Advisor : CONCHON, Sylvain

Funding : Contrat doctoral uniquement recherche
Affiliation : Université Paris-Saclay
Laboratory : LRI - salle 465 du PCRI, bâtiment 650 Ada Lovelace

Defended on 19/12/2019, committee :
M. Sylvain CONCHON, Professeur, LRI, Université Paris-Sud, Directeur de thèse

Mme Charlotte TRUCHET, Maîtresse de conférence, LS2N, Université de Nantes, Rapportrice
M. Pascal POIZAT, Professeur, LIP6, Sorbonne Université, Rapporteur

Mme Dominique QUADRI, Professeure, LRI, Université Paris-Sud, Examinatrice
M. Philippe QUÉINNEC, Professeur, IRIT, ENSEEIHT, Examinateur
M. Étienne ANDRÉ, Professeur, LORIA, Université de Lorraine, Examinateur

Research activities :

Abstract :
This thesis proposes to present several extensions that have been added to the Cubicle model checker.

Cubicle is a software allowing to automatically check the safety of parameterized systems using model checking modulo theory techniques.

The first contribution made by this thesis consists in the implementation of a new reachability algorithm called FAR (for Forward Abstracted Reachabilty). FAR is an algorithm involving both backward reachability analysis techniques already implemented in Cubicle as well as forward reachability analysis techniques.

The second contribution consists of multiple additions inspired by artificial intelligence methods to improve the automatic generation of Cubicle invariants.

Finally, the last contribution has increased Cubicle's expressiveness in order to prove properties involving universal quantifiers. This contribution was implemented by associating Cubicle with Why3, a deductive verification platform.

Ph.D. dissertations & Faculty habilitations
MICRO VISUALIZATIONS: DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF VISUALIZATIONS FOR SMALL DISPLAY SPACES
The topic of this habilitation is the study of very small data visualizations, micro visualizations, in display contexts that can only dedicate minimal rendering space for data representations. For several years, together with my collaborators, I have been studying human perception, interaction, and analysis with micro visualizations in multiple contexts. In this document I bring together three of my research streams related to micro visualizations: data glyphs, where my joint research focused on studying the perception of small-multiple micro visualizations, word-scale visualizations, where my joint research focused on small visualizations embedded in text-documents, and small mobile data visualizations for smartwatches or fitness trackers. I consider these types of small visualizations together under the umbrella term ``micro visualizations.'' Micro visualizations are useful in multiple visualization contexts and I have been working towards a better understanding of the complexities involved in designing and using micro visualizations. Here, I define the term micro visualization, summarize my own and other past research and design guidelines and outline several design spaces for different types of micro visualizations based on some of the work I was involved in since my PhD.

A NEW GENERATION OF GRAPH NEURAL NETWORKS TO TACKLE AMORPHOUS MATERIALS


SPOTTING NEURAL NETWORK BOTTLENECKS AND FIXING THEM BY ARCHITECTURE GROWTH