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Ph.D de

Ph.D
Group : Human-Centered Computing

Interactive Prototyping of Interactions: From Throwaway Prototypes to Takeaway Prototyping

Starts on 01/10/2015
Advisor : BEAUDOUIN-LAFON, Michel

Funding : Contrat doctoral organisme (EPST, EPA ayant une mission d'enseignement supérieur)
Affiliation : Université Paris-Sud
Laboratory : LRI - HCC

Defended on 12/12/2018, committee :
Directeur de these :
- Michel BEAUDOUIN-LAFON, Université Paris-Sud.

Rapporteurs:
- Björn HARTMANN, UC Berkeley;
- Nicolai MARQUARDT, UCL Interaction Centre.

Examinateurs :
- Jan BORCHERS, RWTH Aachen University;
- Fanny CHEVALIER, University of Toronto;
- Jean-Daniel FEKETE, INRIA Saclay.

Research activities :

Abstract :
Interaction designers rely on rapid prototyping to explore ideas with throwaway artifacts. I argue that novel rapid prototyping tools can be built to effectively support disposable as well as reusable artifacts for sketching interactive behaviors. I present two new tools for video prototyping -VideoClipper and Montage-, a classification of the most common problems during designer-developer collaboration, and four principles to mitigate them. I applied these principles to create a novel collaborative prototyping tool called Enact. Results suggest that Enact helps participants detect more edge cases, increases designers' participation and provides new opportunities for co-creation. Then, I reflect on the underlying theoretical principles of the three tools: reification, polymorphism, reuse and information substrates. Finally, I present Takeaway Prototyping, a new prototyping approach focused on bringing iterative prototyping to early-stage design.

Ph.D. dissertations & Faculty habilitations
DECODING THE PLATFORM SOCIETY: ORGANIZATIONS, MARKETS AND NETWORKS IN THE DIGITAL ECONOMY
The original manuscript conceptualizes the recent rise of digital platforms along three main dimensions: their nature of coordination devices fueled by data, the ensuing transformations of labor, and the accompanying promises of societal innovation. The overall ambition is to unpack the coordination role of the platform and where it stands in the horizon of the classical firm – market duality. It is also to precisely understand how it uses data to do so, where it drives labor, and how it accommodates socially innovative projects. I extend this analysis to show continuity between today’s society dominated by platforms and the “organizational society”, claiming that platforms are organized structures that distribute resources, produce asymmetries of wealth and power, and push social innovation to the periphery of the system. I discuss the policy implications of these tendencies and propose avenues for follow-up research.

DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING WITH LIMITED RESOURCES


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