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Ph.D de

Ph.D
Group : Human-Centered Computing

Designing for Ecosystems of Communication Apps

Starts on 01/10/2015
Advisor : MACKAY, Wendy

Funding :
Affiliation : Université Paris-Sud
Laboratory : LRI - HCC

Defended on 11/12/2018, committee :
Directrice de thèse:
- Wendy Mackay, Inria Saclay

Rapporteurs:
- Louise Barkhuus, The IT University of Copenhagen;
- Cliff Lampe, University of Michigan.

Examinateurs:
- John Tang, Microsoft Research;
- Annie Gentes, Télécom Paris-Tech ;
- Myriam Lewcowicz, Université de Technologie de Troyes.

Research activities :

Abstract :
More and more, people communicate via not one, but many messaging apps and social media platforms. In particular, couples, close friends and families use multiple apps to express caring in diverse ways throughout the day. I argue that we need a deeper understanding of how people communicate via ecosystems of communication apps. In this thesis, I show that the way people communicate in an app is not only influenced by its contacts and functionality but also by the contacts and functionality in their other apps. I also show how app-exclusive features prevent people from expressing themselves consistently across their apps. Moreover, I present novel designs, technologies and studies that explore how to better support ecosystems of communication apps by repurposing three mechanisms currently available in mobile operating systems: notifications, which users can overlay on top of any open app; gesture commands, which users could perform on any app that recognizes gestures; and soft keyboards, which appear in any app where users can type text.

Ph.D. dissertations & Faculty habilitations
DECODING THE PLATFORM SOCIETY: ORGANIZATIONS, MARKETS AND NETWORKS IN THE DIGITAL ECONOMY
The original manuscript conceptualizes the recent rise of digital platforms along three main dimensions: their nature of coordination devices fueled by data, the ensuing transformations of labor, and the accompanying promises of societal innovation. The overall ambition is to unpack the coordination role of the platform and where it stands in the horizon of the classical firm – market duality. It is also to precisely understand how it uses data to do so, where it drives labor, and how it accommodates socially innovative projects. I extend this analysis to show continuity between today’s society dominated by platforms and the “organizational society”, claiming that platforms are organized structures that distribute resources, produce asymmetries of wealth and power, and push social innovation to the periphery of the system. I discuss the policy implications of these tendencies and propose avenues for follow-up research.

DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING WITH LIMITED RESOURCES


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