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Ph.D de

Ph.D
Group : Human-Centered Computing

From data exploration to presentation: designing new systems and interaction techniques to enhance the sense-making process

Starts on 01/06/2016
Advisor : PIETRIGA, Emmanuel

Funding : Convention industrielle de formation par la recherche
Affiliation : vide
Laboratory : LRI - HCC

Defended on 03/10/2019, committee :
Directeur de thèse :
- Emmanuel Pietriga, Directeur de Recherche, Inria Saclay

Co-directeur de thèse :
- Caroline Appert, Directeur de Recherche, CNRS

Rapporteurs :
- David Auber, Professeur, Université de Bordeaux
- Daniel Wigdor, Professeur, University of Toronto

Examinateurs :
- Jean-Daniel Fekete, Directeur de Recherche, Inria Saclay
- Uta Hinrichs, Professeur, University of St Andrews
- Stephane Huot, Directeur de Recherche, Inria Lille

Research activities :

Abstract :
During the last decade, the amount of data has been constantly increasing. These data can come from several sources such as smartphones, audio recorders, cameras, sensors, simulations, and can have various structure. While computers can help us process these data, human judgment and domain expertise is what turns the data into actual knowledge. However, making sense of this increasing amount of diverse data requires visualization and interaction techniques.This thesis contributes such techniques to facilitate data exploration and presentation, during sense-making activities.

We show in this thesis that the sense-making process can be enhanced in both processes of exploration and presentation, by using ink as a new medium to transition between exploration and externalization, and by following a flexible, iterative process to create expressive data representations.The resulting systems establish a research framework where presentation and exploration are a core part of visual data systems.

Ph.D. dissertations & Faculty habilitations
DECODING THE PLATFORM SOCIETY: ORGANIZATIONS, MARKETS AND NETWORKS IN THE DIGITAL ECONOMY
The original manuscript conceptualizes the recent rise of digital platforms along three main dimensions: their nature of coordination devices fueled by data, the ensuing transformations of labor, and the accompanying promises of societal innovation. The overall ambition is to unpack the coordination role of the platform and where it stands in the horizon of the classical firm – market duality. It is also to precisely understand how it uses data to do so, where it drives labor, and how it accommodates socially innovative projects. I extend this analysis to show continuity between today’s society dominated by platforms and the “organizational society”, claiming that platforms are organized structures that distribute resources, produce asymmetries of wealth and power, and push social innovation to the periphery of the system. I discuss the policy implications of these tendencies and propose avenues for follow-up research.

DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING WITH LIMITED RESOURCES


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