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Ph.D de

Ph.D
Group : Parallel Systems

Overcoming interference in the beeping communication model

Starts on 01/10/2016
Advisor : BEAUQUIER, Joffroy
[Janna BURMAN]

Funding : Contrat doctoral uniquement recherche
Affiliation : Université Paris-Sud
Laboratory : LRI - ParSys

Defended on 27/09/2019, committee :
Directeur de thèse :
- M. Joffroy Beauquier (Université Paris-Sud)

Co-encadrant :
- Mme. Janna Burman (Université Paris-Sud)

Rapporteurs :
- M. Roger Wattenhofer (ETH Zurich)
- M. Arnaud Casteigts (Université de Bordeaux)

Examinateurs :
- Mme. Colette Johnen (Université de Bordeaux )
- M. Pierre Fraigniaud (Université Paris Diderot)
- M. Devan Sohier (Université de Versailles)

Research activities :

Abstract :
Small inexpensive inter-communicating electronic devices have become widely available. Although the individual device has severely limited capabilities (e.g., basic communication, constant-size memory or limited mobility), multitudes of such weak devices communicating together are able to form low-cost, easily deployable, yet highly performant networks. Such distributed systems present significant challenges however when it comes to the design of efficient, scalable and simple algorithms.

In this thesis, we are interested in studying such systems composed of devices with severely limited communication capabilities - using only simple bursts of energy. These distributed systems may be modeled using the beeping model, in which nodes communicate by beeping or listening to their neighbors (according to some undirected communication graph). Simultaneous communications (i.e., collisions) result in non-destructive interference: a node with two or more neighbors beeping simultaneously detects a beep.

Its simple, general and energy efficient communication mechanism makes the beeping model widely applicable. However, that simplicity comes at a cost. Due to the poor expressiveness of beeps and the interference caused by simultaneous communications, algorithm design is challenging. Throughout the thesis, we overcome both difficulties in order to provide efficient communication primitives. A particular focus of the thesis is on deterministic and time-efficient solutions independent of the communication graph’s parameters (i.e., uniform).

Ph.D. dissertations & Faculty habilitations
DECODING THE PLATFORM SOCIETY: ORGANIZATIONS, MARKETS AND NETWORKS IN THE DIGITAL ECONOMY
The original manuscript conceptualizes the recent rise of digital platforms along three main dimensions: their nature of coordination devices fueled by data, the ensuing transformations of labor, and the accompanying promises of societal innovation. The overall ambition is to unpack the coordination role of the platform and where it stands in the horizon of the classical firm – market duality. It is also to precisely understand how it uses data to do so, where it drives labor, and how it accommodates socially innovative projects. I extend this analysis to show continuity between today’s society dominated by platforms and the “organizational society”, claiming that platforms are organized structures that distribute resources, produce asymmetries of wealth and power, and push social innovation to the periphery of the system. I discuss the policy implications of these tendencies and propose avenues for follow-up research.

DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING WITH LIMITED RESOURCES


VALORISATION DES DONNéES POUR LA RECHERCHE D'EMPLO